SIGSOFT / ACM Webinars

We hope you can join us for the upcoming SIGOFT and ACM PD sponsored webinars.

Follow the links below to register for these free 60 minute webinars and be sure to share this with friends and colleagues who may be interested in this topic. Check out our past events, all available on demand.

Each talk will be followed by a moderated live question and answer session.

Note: If you'd like to attend but can't make it to the virtual event, you still need to register to receive a recording of the webinar when it becomes available. You can stream this and all ACM SIGSOFT and ACM Learning Webinars on your mobile device, including smartphones and tablets.

Transferring Software Testing Tools to Practice
June 22, 2016 at 12:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time

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Speakers: Nikolai Tillmann, Microsoft, Judith Bishop, Microsoft Research and Tao Xie, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Abstract:
Achieving successful technology adoption in practice has often been an important goal for both academic and industrial researchers. However, it is generally challenging to transfer research results into industrial products or into tools that are widely adopted. What are the key factors that lead to practical impact for a research project? This talk presents our experiences and lessons learned in successfully transferring tools from a medium-sized software testing project, Pex (http://research.microsoft.com/pex). Over the course of nearly a decade, the collaboration between groups at Microsoft across the world, and academics in various universities has led to high-impact tools that are now shipped by the company and adopted by the community. These tools include Fakes, a test isolation framework shipped with Visual Studio 2012/2013; IntelliTest, an automatic test generation tool shipped with Visual Studio 2015; and Code Hunt (https://www.codehunt.com), a popular serious gaming platform for coding contests and practicing programming skills, which has attracted hundreds of thousands of users since 2014. Attendees will take away with some general ideas from our experiences that they can apply within their own projects.

Speaker Bios:
Nikolai Tillmann is a Principal Software Engineering Manager in the Tools for Software Engineers group at Microsoft in Redmond, USA, where he is currently leading an effort on cloud-based software engineering. His main areas of research are mobile and cloud-based software engineering, program analysis, and testing. He started and led the TouchDevelop project, the Pex/IntelliTest project, and the Pex4Fun/Code Hunt project. He has had rich history of co-presenting various tutorials on software testing and TouchDevelop.

Judith Bishop is Director of Computer Science in Microsoft Research, in Redmond, USA, where her role is to create strong links between Microsoft's research groups and universities globally. Her current focus is on open source tools for academics. Recent projects include TryF#, TouchDevelop, Code Hunt and the Quantum simulator LIQUi|>. Her research expertise is in programming languages and distributed systems. Before joining Microsoft, she was a professor in South Africa, and has presented many talks and keynotes on software. She is an ACM Distinguished Educator.

Tao Xie is an Associate Professor and Willett Faculty Scholar in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA. He worked as a visiting researcher at Microsoft Research. His research interests are in software engineering, focusing on software testing, program analysis, software analytics, software security, and educational software engineering. He was an ACM Distinguished Speaker and is an IEEE Computer Society Distinguished Visitor. He is an ACM Distinguished Scientist.

Lies, Damned Lies and Software Analytics: Why Big Data Needs Thick Data
May 4, 2016 at 12:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time

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Speakers: Margaret-Anne Storey, University of Victoria, and Robert Dyer, Bowling Green State University

Abstract:
Software analytics and the use of computational methods on "big" data in software engineering is transforming the ways software is developed, used, improved and deployed. Software engineering researchers and practitioners are witnessing an increasing trend in the availability of diverse trace and operational data and the methods to analyze it. This information is being used to paint a picture of how software is engineered and suggest ways it may be improved. But we have to remember that software engineering is inherently a socio-technical endeavour, with complex practices, activities and cultural aspects that cannot be externalized or captured by tools alone -- in fact, they may be perturbed when trace data is surfaced and analyzed in a transparent manner.

In this talk, I will ask:

  • Are researchers and practitioners adequately considering the unanticipated impacts that software analytics can have on software engineering processes and stakeholders?
  • Are there important questions that are not being asked because the answers do not lie in the data that are readily available?
  • Can we improve the application of software analytics using other methods that collect insights directly from participants in software engineering (e.g., through observations)?

I will explore these questions through specific examples and discuss how software analytics that depend on "big data" from tools, as well as methods that collect "thick" data from participants, can be mutually beneficial in improving software engineering research and practice.

Speaker Bios:
Dr. Margaret-Anne Storey is a professor of computer science at the University of Victoria, a Visiting Scientist at the IBM Centre for Advanced Studies in Toronto, and a Canada Research Chair in Software and Knowledge Visualization. She is a principal investigator for the National Center for Biomedical Ontology in the United States and one of the principal investigators for CSER (Centre for Software Engineering Research) in Canada. Her research goal is to understand how technology can help people explore, understand and share complex information and knowledge. She evaluates and applies techniques from knowledge engineering, social software and visual interface design to applications such as collaborative software development, program comprehension, biomedical ontology development, and learning in Web-based environments. Some of her recent projects include investigating the role of social media in collaborative software engineering, improving information visualization techniques and developing social software to facilitate the next version of the International Classification of Diseases with the World Health Organization.

Robert Dyer is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science at Bowling Green State University. He received his Ph.D. from Iowa State University in 2013. His research areas are in Software Engineering, Big Data applications, and Programming Languages. Currently his research focuses on the Boa project, that provides a domain-specific language and infrastructure to allow researchers to easily mine a very large number of software repositories. Robert has served on the organizing committee for ICSE, co-chaired the MSR mining challenge, the program committee for Modularity and OOPSLA Artifacts, and reviewed for journals such as TSE and Empirical Software Engineering. He is currently a member of ACM SIGSOFT and SIGPLAN, and the ACM SIGSOFT Webinar Coordinator.

Improving Software Development Productivity Minute-by-Minute
January 20, 2016 at 12:00 PM Eastern Standard Time

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Speakers: Gail C. Murphy, Tasktop Technologies and University of British Columbia, and Betty Zakheim, Tasktop Technologies

Abstract:
Everyone seems to want more software developed and produced faster. Yet simply ramping up the number of individuals able to produce software is not sufficient; it is also important to improve the productivity of the software developers. But, what is software development productivity anyway? When do software developers consider themselves productive? What friction exists in software development that lowers productivity? In this talk, Gail Murphy will discuss recent studies about software development productivity from the eyes of developers and will suggest directions to improve software development productivity based on the daily activities of software developers. This talk includes joint work with T. Fritz (U. Zürich), A. Meyer (U. Zürich) and T. Zimmermann (Microsoft Research).

Speaker Bios:
Gail C. Murphy is co-founder and Chief Scientist at Tasktop Technologies Inc. She is also a Professor (Computer Science) and Associate Dean (Research & Grad) in the Faculty of Science at UBC. Her research interests are in improving the productivity of software developers and knowledge workers by giving them tools to identify, manage and coordinate the information that really matters for their work.
In recognition of her research, Gail has been a keynote speaker at several software engineering conferences. She has received international awards, such as the AITO Dahl-Nygaard Junior Prize, a University of Washington College of Engineering Diamond Award, and an ACM Distinguished Scientist award. Her national awards include the NSERC Steacie fellowship. Most notably, Gail was elected to be a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada.

Betty Zakheim's role is at the vertex between our customers, our product team and our marketing team. She brings to this role an extensive background in software development, software integration technologies and software development tools. As a software development manager, she was an early adaptor of "iterative development," the precursor to Agile. As the VP of product management and marketing at InConcert (acquired by TIBCO), she pioneered the use of Business Process Management (then called "workflow") as the semantic framework for enterprise application integration.
Previously, Betty served as vice president of marketing and product management for CopperEye (a UK-based, VC-backed software company) and InConcert (a Xerox New Enterprise Company), and VP of product strategy at SmartBear. She has also been director of marketing or product manager at Progress Software, IBM/Rational Software, IONA Technologies and Lightbridge. Betty founded and ran her own consulting firm, Outside In Solutions, where she counseled software companies on go-to-market strategies. Earlier in her career, she served in very technical roles as an engineer, UX developer, engineering manager, and in technical consulting positions.
Betty holds undergraduate degrees in Psychology, Advertising (from the S.I. Newhouse College of Public Communications) and is a Tau Beta Pi scholar in Computer Engineering. She also received a Master of Computer Science degree from Boston University.

Lessons Learned from the International Workshop on Release Engineering
December 18, 2015 at 2:00 PM Eastern Standard Time

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Speakers: Bram Adams, Polytechnique Montreal, Stephany Bellomo, SEI, Foutse Khomh, Polytechnique Montreal, Shane McIntosh, McGill University

Abstract:
The release engineering process brings high quality code changes from a developer's workspace to the end user, encompassing (amongst others) the integration of code changes, continuous building/testing of such changes (CI), setup of deployment environments, deployment and release. Recent practices of continuous delivery, which bring changes to the end user in the order of days or hours rather than years, have convinced many companies to invest in their release engineering pipeline and teams. However, what exactly should these companies invest in? Which continuous delivery strategies work, and which ones did not (and why)? Do only large companies benefit? These and other questions were targeted by the past three editions of the International Workshop on Release Engineering (RELENG) and the 1st IEEE Software Special Issue on Release Engineering. This webinar will revisit the major insights and discussion points of RELENG, aiming to provide a starting point for companies to decide on their future release engineering strategy.

Speaker Bios:
Bram Adams is an assistant professor at Polytechnique Montréal (Canada), where he heads the MCIS lab on Maintenance, Construction and Intelligence of Software. He obtained his PhD at the GH-SEL lab at Ghent University (Belgium), and was an adjunct assistant professor in the Software Analysis and Intelligence Lab at Queen's University (Canada). His research interests include all aspects of software release engineering, mining software repositories and software maintenance. His work has been published at premier software engineering venues such as EMSE, TSE, ICSE, FSE, ASE, MSR and ICSME. In addition to co-organizing RELENG 2013 to 2015 (and the 1st IEEE SW Special Issue on Release Engineering), he co-organized the PLATE, ACP4IS, MUD and MISS workshops, and the MSR Vision 2020 Summer School. He has been or is PC co-chair of SCAM 2013, SANER 2015 and ICSME 2016.

Stephany Bellomo is a member of the technical staff at the Software Engineering Institute, Carnegie Mellon University. She has an MS in Software Engineering from George Mason University. Bellomo focuses her time on empirical research for improving software delivery and working with DoD/government practitioners on software-related challenges. Recent publications include papers on practices to enable rapid deployment. Bellomo served on the program committee as the Tutorial Chair for the 2013 Software Engineering Institute (SEI) Architecture Technology User Network (SATURN) Conference and has served as a technical reviewer yearly for the SATURN conference since 2010. She also served as a technical reviewer for the SEI Software Product Lines conference 2013. Ms. Bellomo teaches SEI courses in Service-Oriented Architecture Migration of Legacy Components as well as Software Architecture Principles and Practice. Prior to joining the SEI, Bellomo worked as a software developer/DBA and technical lead building software systems ranging from satellites to public facing e commerce websites for organizations such as Intuit, Lockheed Martin and Verisign.

Foutse Khomh is an assistant professor at the Ecole Polytechnique de Montréal (Canada). He received a Ph.D in Software Engineering from the University of Montreal in 2010, under the supervision of Yann-Gaël Guéhéneuc. His main research interest is in the field of empirical software engineering, with an emphasis on developing techniques and tools to improve software quality. He has studied many aspects of the release engineering process of large software companies such as RIM and Mozilla, and has published several papers in international conferences and journals, including ICSM, MSR, WCRE, ICWS, JSS, JSP, and EMSE. He is the recipient of a best paper award from the European Research Consortium for Informatics and Mathematics. Foutse has served on the program committees of several international conferences including ICSM, WCRE, MSR, ICPC, and has reviewed for top international journals such as SQJ, EMSE, and TSE. He co-organized the LMO 2008 and CAL 2008 conferences, and is program co-chair of the Workshops track at WCRE 2013 and program chair of the Tool track at SCAM 2013.

Shane McIntosh is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at McGill University. He received his Bachelor's degree from the University of Guelph and his MSc and PhD degrees from Queen's University, where he held an NSERC Vanier Scholarship. In his research, Shane uses empirical software engineering techniques to study software build systems, release engineering, and software quality. His research has been published at several top-tier software engineering venues, such as the International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE), the International Symposium on the Foundations of Software Engineering (FSE), and the Springer Journal of Empirical Software Engineering (EMSE). Shane actively collaborates with academics in Canada, the Netherlands, Singapore, Brazil, and Japan, as well as industrial practitioners in Germany and the USA.

Software Testing: A Research Travelogue
November 18, 2015 at 12:00 PM Eastern Standard Time

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Speakers: Alessandro Orso, Georgia Institute of Technology, Gregg Rothermel, University of Nebraska-Lincoln and Willem Visser, Stellenbosch University

Abstract:
Despite decades of work by researchers and practitioners on numerous software quality assurance techniques, testing remains one of the most widely practiced and studied approaches for assessing and improving software quality. In this webinar, which is based on our ICSE 2014 "Future of Software Engineering" paper, we provide an accounting of some of the most successful research performed in software testing in the last 15 years and present some of the most significant challenges and opportunities in this area. To be more inclusive in this effort, and to go beyond our own personal opinions and biases, we began this effort by collecting the input of 50 of our colleagues, both in academia and in industry, who are active in the testing research area. What we will provide is therefore not only our views, but also those of the software testing community in general.

Speaker Bios:
Alessandro Orso is a Professor in the College of Computing at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He received his M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering (1995) and his Ph.D. in Computer Science (1999) from Politecnico di Milano, Italy. From March 2000, he has been at Georgia Tech. His area of research is software engineering, with emphasis on software testing and program analysis. His interests include the development of techniques and tools for improving software reliability, security, and trustworthiness, and the validation of such techniques on real-world systems. Dr. Orso has received funding for his research from both government agencies, such as DARPA and NSF, and industry, such as Fujitsu Labs, Google, IBM, and Microsoft. He served on the editorial boards of ACM TOSEM and on the Advisory Board of Reflective Corp, served as program chair for ACM-SIGSOFT ISSTA 2010 and program co-chair for IEEE ICST 2013 and ACM-SIGSOFT FSE 2014, and will serve as program co-chair for ACM-SIGSOFT/IEEE ICSE 2017. He has also served as a technical consultant to DARPA. Dr. Orso is a senior member of the ACM and of the IEEE Computer Society.

Gregg Rothermel is Professor and Jensen Chair of Software Engineering at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. He received the Ph.D. in Computer Science from Clemson University working with Mary Jean Harrold, the M.S. in Computer Science from SUNY Albany, and a B.A. in Philosophy from Reed College. His research interests include software engineering and program analysis, with emphases on the application of program analysis techniques to problems in software maintenance and testing, end-user software engineering, and empirical studies. He received a National Science Foundation CAREER Award in 1996 for his research on software maintenance and testing. He co-founded and leads the development of the Software-Artifact Infrastructure Repository (SIR), a repository of software-related artifacts that support rigorous controlled experiments with program analysis and software testing techniques, and has been utilized, to-date, by more than 1000 persons from over 300 institutions around the world, supporting over 200 scientific publications. His research has also been supported by NSF, DARPA, AFOSR, Boeing Commercial Airplane Group, Microsoft, Lockheed Martin, and Rogue Wave Software. Dr. Rothermel He is a member of the Editorial Boards of the Empirical Software Engineering Journal and Software Quality Journal. Previous positions include Associate Editor in Chief for IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, General Chair for the 2009 International Symposium on Software Testing and Analysis, Program Co-Chair for the 2007 International Conference on Software Engineering, and Program Chair for the 2004 ACM International Symposium on Software Testing and Analysis.

Willem Visser is a professor in Computer Science at Stellenbosch University, South Africa. Before joining Stellenbosch in 2009, he spent 8 years at NASA Ames Research Center, where he was one of the research leads for the Java PathFinder project. His research interests include model checking, testing, symbolic execution and model counting. He has been program co-chair of ASE in 2008 and is ICSE program co-chair in 2016. He is also currently on the steering committee for ICSE and SPIN, on the executive committee of ACM SIGSOFT and a member of the editorial board of TOSEM. More information can be found on his webpage.

Traceability is the New Black!
October 07, 2015 at 12:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time

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Speaker: Jane Cleland-Huang, DePaul University

Abstract:
Modern Software and Systems engineering projects produce large quantities of data as a natural byproduct of the engineering process. Artifacts include user stories, requirements, design documents, source code, commit logs, project plans, and much more. When combined with the power of software analytics, this data can deliver actionable intelligence into the hands of project stakeholders. Such intelligence supports decision making, process improvement, safety analysis, and a myriad other software engineering tasks. In this talk, Professor Cleland-Huang first discusses the diverse queries that project stakeholders need and want to ask. She then presents process-driven, dynamic traceability solutions for establishing meaningful associations between artifacts. These traceability solutions are designed, wherever possible to establish traceability as a byproduct of the development process, and where not possible, to leverage just-in-time information retrieval solutions. Professor Cleland-Huang then shows how the traceability infrastructure supports powerful query mechanisms which are capable of retrieving and processing raw data in order to deliver real project intelligence. In particular, she will present TiQi: A Natural Language Interface for querying software projects and provide examples of diverse analytic queries. Given the benefits of such query mechanisms and the irreplaceable role of Traceability in achieving them leads to the bold claim that Traceability has become the New Black!

Speaker Bio:
Dr. Jane Cleland-Huang is Professor of Software Engineering in the School of Computing at DePaul University, Chicago, where she serves as the director of the Systems and Requirements Engineering Center. She also serves as the North American Director of the International Center of Excellence for Software Traceability. Her research interests emphasize the application of machine learning and information retrieval methods to tackle large-scale Software Requirements problems. Dr. Cleland-Huang serves on the Editorial Board for the Requirements Engineering Journal, and as Associate Editor for IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering and IEEE Software. She has been the recipient of the US National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development Award, four ACM SIGSOFT Distinguished Paper Awards and 2006 IFIP TC2 Manfred Paul Award for Excellence in Software: Theory and Practice. She is a member of the IEEE Computer Society and the IEEE Women in Engineering. She received her PhD in Computer Science from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Probabilistic Programming: Algorithms, Applications and Synthesis
September 30, 2015 at 12:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time

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Speaker: Aditya Nori, Senior Researcher, Microsoft Research India

Abstract:
Recent years have seen a huge shift in the kind of programs that most programmers write. Programs are increasingly data driven instead of being algorithm driven. They use various forms of machine learning techniques to build models from data, for the purpose of decision making. Indeed, search engines, social networks, speech recognition, computer vision, and applications that use data from clinical trials, biological experiments, and sensors, are all examples of data driven programs. We use the term "probabilistic programs" to refer to data driven programs that are written using higher-level abstractions. Though they span various application domains, all data driven programs have to deal with uncertainty in the data, and face similar issues in design, debugging, optimization and deployment. In this talk, we describe connections this research area called "Probabilistic Programming" has with programming languages and software engineering — this includes language design, static and dynamic analysis of programs, and program synthesis. We survey current state of the art and speculate on promising directions for future research.

Speaker Bio:
Aditya Nori is a member of the Programming Languages and Tools group at Microsoft Research India. His research interests are: the design and analysis of reliable intelligent systems, probabilistic programming and synthesis. Over the past few years, he has worked on exploring various synergies between programming languages and machine learning – these include the use of machine learning techniques for proving programs correct, specification inference via Bayesian analysis, probabilistic programming via program analysis, and productivity tools for machine learning tasks. He is a co-winner of the ACM SIGSOFT Distinguished Paper award at FSE 2006 and FSE 2015. He received his PhD in computer science from the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore.

Teaching Future Software Developers
September 16, 2015 at 12:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time

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Speaker: Václav Rajlich, Wayne State University

Abstract:
Both employers and graduate schools expect computer science graduates to be able to work on software projects as developers, yet many computer science programs fail in that fundamental goal. This webcast describes how the first software engineering course (1SEC) can be reorganized in order to meet these expectations. The webcast first presents seven common dead-end approaches to 1SEC (“deadly sins”). We avoided the deadly sins by teaching the evolutionary software development (ESD) which is the current software development mainstream; agile, iterative, and open source processes are variants of ESD. The fundamental task of ESD is software change that adds new feature to an existing program. We teach phased model of software change that divides software change into phases and helps novices to add new features to complex unfamiliar programs. Our 1SEC projects use open-source programs and students add new features to these programs; this gives them experience with projects of realistic size and complexity, without requiring extraordinary effort to reach that size. The webcast presents our experience with this approach. The webcast also proposes follow-up courses that would teach additional skills the future developers may need.

Speaker Bio:
Václav Rajlich is Professor and former Chair of Computer Science at Wayne State University. His research centers on software development, software evolution, and comprehension. He has published over 100 refereed papers in journals and conferences. He also published a book that covers the current software engineering issues and software developer skills. He is the founder of the IEEE International Conference on Program Comprehension (ICPC) and was a Program Chair, General Chair, and Steering Committee Chair of IEEE International Conference on Software Maintenance and Evolution (ICSME). He is a member of Advisory Editorial Board of Journal of Software: Evolution and Process.

Engineering Smart Cyber Physical Systems
September 8, 2015 at 12:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time

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Speakers: Danny Weyns, Linnaeus University, and Tomas Bures, Charles University

Abstract:
Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) are large-scale networked distributed systems that combine various data sources to control real-world ecosystems (e.g. intelligent traffic control). One of the trends is to endow such systems with "smart" capabilities, typically in the form of self-awareness and self-adaptation, along with the traditional qualities of safety and dependability. The combination of these requirements together with specifics of smart CPS render traditional software engineering (SE) techniques not directly applicable, making systematic SE of smart CPS a challenging task. In this webinar, we report on the results of the First International Workshop on Software Engineering of Smart Cyber-Physical Systems (SEsCPS 2015), where 25 participants discussed characteristics, challenges and opportunities of SE for smart CPS. In the first part we discuss "Core Themes" that we derived from the contributions presented in the morning session of the workshop. Themes include: Faults and conflicts; Modeling, testing, and verification; and Collaboration. In the second part of the webinar, we elaborate on "Open Research Topics" that we derived from the results of the workshop’s afternoon breakout sessions. Topics include: Aligning different disciplines; Human in the loop; Uncertainty; and Pragmatic vs. systematic engineering.

Speaker Bios:
Danny Weyns is a professor at Linnaeus University Sweden, where he leads the AdaptWise research group. From October 2015 onwards, he will be affiliated with DistriNet Labs at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium. His main research interest is in software engineering of self-adaptive systems. He studies formalisms and design models to realize and assure self-adaptation for different quality goals. The current focus is on mechanisms for handling multiple adaptation goals, executable formal models, and the application of control theory for enhancing software with adaptation features. Results are empirically validated in the domains of smart homes, mobile systems, and robotic systems.

Tomas Bures is an associate professor at the Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic. He is a chair of the Department of Distributed and Dependable Systems. In the past, he also held a visiting professor position at Ludwig-Maximilians Universitäaut;t, Müaut;nchen, Germany and a postdoc position at Mälardalen University, Sweden. His current research focuses on component-based modeling, software architectures and multi-paradigm modeling of smart cyber-physical systems.

Traceability Beyond Source Code: An Elusive Target?
July 31, 2015 at 12:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time

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Speaker: Lionel C. Briand, University of Luxembourg

Abstract:
This talk will report on more than a decade of experience regarding system traceability and its applications. Various forms of traceability between requirements, design decisions, and test cases are required by numerous industry standards. Traceability research is the focus of limited attention but is nevertheless an extremely important topic. I will present an overview of the field and its challenges based on project experience with industry. Going through three recent projects, I will illustrate my main points and reflections on the subject. The focus of this presentation will be on traceability between requirements, design decisions, and test cases, as traceability research has been largely code-centric to date.

Speaker Bio:
Lionel C. Briand is professor and FNR PEARL chair in software verification and validation at the SnT centre for Security, Reliability, and Trust, University of Luxembourg. He also acts as vice-director of the centre. Lionel started his career as a software engineer in France (CS Communications & Systems) and has conducted applied research in collaboration with industry for more than 20 years. Until moving to Luxembourg in January 2012, he was heading the Certus center for software verification and validation at Simula Research Laboratory, where he was leading applied research projects in collaboration with industrial partners. Before that, he was on the faculty of the department of Systems and Computer Engineering, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada, where he was full professor and held the Canada Research Chair (Tier I) in Software Quality Engineering. He has also been the software quality engineering department head at the Fraunhofer Institute for Experimental Software Engineering, Germany, and worked as a research scientist for the Software Engineering Laboratory, a consortium of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, CSC, and the University of Maryland, USA. Lionel was elevated to the grade of IEEE Fellow for his work on the testing of object-oriented systems. He was recently granted the IEEE Computer Society Harlan Mills award and the IEEE Reliability Society engineer-of-the-year award for his work on model-based verification and testing. His research interests include: software testing and verification, model-driven software development, search-based software engineering, and empirical software engineering. Lionel has been on the program, steering, or organization committees of many international, IEEE and ACM conferences. He is the coeditor-in-chief of Empirical Software Engineering (Springer) and is a member of the editorial boards of Systems and Software Modeling (Springer) and Software Testing, Verification, and Reliability (Wiley).

Are You Getting Traction? Tales from the Tech Transfer Trenches
June 25, 2015 at 12:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time

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Speaker: Satish Chandra, Senior Principal Engineer, Samsung Electronics

Abstract:
So you have developed a new software productivity tool, published a research paper about it, and you are justifiably proud of your work. If you work for a company, your (curmudgeonly) manager now wants to see its "impact" on the business. This is the part where you have to convince someone else to use your shiny new tool in their day-to-day work, or ship it as a product. But, you soon realize that getting traction with developers or product managers is significantly harder than the research itself. Sound familiar?

In the past several years, Satish was involved in taking a variety of software productivity tools to various constituencies within a company: internal users, product teams, and service delivery teams. In this talk, he would like to share the experiences he had in interacting with these constituencies; sometimes successful experiences, but at other times not so successful ones. The webinar will focus broadly on tools in two areas: bug finding and test automation. Satish will make some observations on when tech transfer works and when it stumbles.

Speaker Bio:
Satish Chandra obtained a PhD from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1997, and a B.Tech from the Indian Institute of Technology-Kanpur in 1991, both in computer science. From 1997 to 2002, he was a member of technical staff at Bell Laboratories, where his research focused on program analysis, domain-specific languages, and data-communication protocols. From 2002 to 2013, he was a research staff member at IBM Research, where his research focused on bug finding and verification, software synthesis, and test automation. He joined Samsung Electronics in 2013, where he leads the advanced programming tools research team. He is an ACM Distinguished Scientist.

End-User Software Engineering: Beyond the Silos
June 18, 2015 at 01:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time

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Speaker: Margaret Burnett, Oregon State University

Abstract:
End-user programming has become pervasive in our society, with end users programming simulations, courseware, spreadsheets, macros, mashups, and more. This talk considers what happens when we add consideration of the software lifecycle beyond the "coding” phase of end-user programming. Considering other phases is necessary, because there is ample evidence that the programs end users create are filled with errors. End-user software engineering (EUSE) is a research area that aims to invent new kinds of technologies that collaborate with end users to improve the quality of their software.

In this webinar, we describe the present state of EUSE, and challenges in moving forward toward a bright future. We show how the future of EUSE may become over-siloed, restricting future researchers’ vision of what can be achieved. We then show that focusing on the in-the-moment intents of end-user developers can be used to derive a number of promising directions forward for EUSE researchers, and how theories can help us further de-silo future EUSE research. Finally, we discuss how overcoming challenges for the future of end-user software engineering may also bring direct benefits to the future of “classic” software engineering.

Speaker Bio:
Margaret Burnett, Professor of Computer Science at Oregon State University, co-founded the area of end-user software engineering. Her team's "WYSIWYT" systematic testing approach for end-user programmers initiated the groundwork, and in 2003, she co-founded and became Project Director of the EUSES Consortium. Under her leadership, this collaboration grew to 10 institutions whose contributions have helped ordinary end users achieve up to 10 times greater effectiveness at guarding against software defects, receiving wide recognition for technical quality (11 Best Paper recognitions for the project during Burnett’s leadership). Burnett's awards for her own work include several Best Paper recognitions, IBM's International Faculty Award, the NSF Young Investigator Award, and the 2015 NCWIT Faculty Undergraduate Research Mentoring Award. She has served on seven editorial boards and conference committees, including IEEE Trans. on Software Engineering, ACM Trans. on Interactive Intelligent Systems, ACM CHI, and ACM FSE and ACM/IEEE ICSE. Her research is in human aspects of software development, which lies in the intersection of HCI and software engineering, and currently focuses on end-user programming, end-user software engineering, information foraging theory as applied to programming, and gender issues in those contexts.

ACM SIGSOFT Town Hall Webinar
June 08, 2015 at 03:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time

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Speaker: Will Tracz, ACM SIGSOFT Chair

Abstract:
This webinar provides attendees with the who, what, and what next, where of ACM Special Interest Group on Software Engineering. Attendees will be informed of changes in membership benefits, volunteer opportunities, and recent changes in ACM publication policies regarding open source access to conference proceedings. The initial presentation is scheduled for no more than 30 minutes with the remaining half hour reserved for answering questions.

Agile and Evolutionary Software Development
June 02, 2015 at 12:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time

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Speaker: Václav Rajlich, Wayne State University

Abstract:
Successful software requires constant change that is triggered by volatility of requirements, technologies, and stakeholder knowledge. This constant change constitutes software evolution. There is also the new prominence of evolutionary software development that includes agile, iterative, open source, inner source, and other processes; the bulk of software development now happens in the stage of software evolution. This webcast discusses reasons for this shift and new issues that emerged. It also discusses the process of software change, which is the fundamental software evolution task. It briefly contrasts software evolution and software maintenance. It presents both the current state of the art and the perspectives of future advances.

Speaker Bio:
Václav Rajlich is Professor and former Chair of Computer Science at Wayne State University. His research centers on software development, software evolution, and comprehension. He has published over 100 refereed papers in journals and conferences. He also published a book that covers the current software engineering issues and software developer skills. He is the founder of the IEEE International Conference on Program Comprehension (ICPC) and was a Program Chair, General Chair, and Steering Committee Chair of IEEE International Conference on Software Maintenance and Evolution (ICSME). He is a member of Advisory Editorial Board of Journal of Software: Evolution and Process.